The Recipe for Finding the Optimal Blend of Awareness, Motivation, Skills, & Opportunities: Applying Lessons from Baking

AMSO

Conference session by Sara Johnson focusing on ingredients for optimal wellbeing programs

Sara Johnson, PhD

Co-President & CEO, Pro-Change Behavior Systems, Inc.


AAOHN 1.08 | AAFP 1.0 | ACSM 1.0 | CDR 1.0 | NCHEC 1.0

Organizations across the country are struggling with how best to promote wellbeing. There is an increasing recognition that policy, leadership development, and culture initiatives need to be implemented in conjunction with individualized wellbeing programs, but questions remain about how to integrate them effectively.
This presentation will focus on distilling and summarizing lessons from baking to create a recipe for blending key ingredients of well-being initiatives to optimize individual and organizational well-being. For example:
• Several ingredients have special functions in the baking process, some of which are critical to the success of the finished product.
• Some ingredients create reactions that activate other ingredients.
• The quality and ratio of ingredients is crucial.
• Some ingredients are optional.
• Substitutions can work.
Much like recipes often have to be modified (e.g., for altitude), participants will be challenged to customize their own recipes based on the unique characteristics of the wellbeing programs they design or implement.


Presenter Bio(s):

Dr. Sara Johnson is the Co-President & CEO of Pro-Change Behavior Systems, Inc., a research and development company whose mission is to disseminate evidence-based behavior change interventions to improve health and well-being. Dr. Johnson was named a Top 10 Health Promotion Professional in 2015 by WELCOA. In her 18 years at Pro-Change, she has been responsible for generating and leading the implementation of innovative research and development opportunities as well as creating and expanding strategic business alliances. She has been the principal investigator on over $4.7 million in National Institutes of Health grants to examine the effectiveness of Transtheoretical Model-based interventions and has nearly 40 publications including refereed research publications, book chapters, and published reports. In addition, she has applied best practices in behavior change to novel areas such as promoting financially responsible use of health services, continuing medical education, and gaming for health. She is currently leading new research initiatives to integrate individual- and culture-level interventions to enhance well-being; increase engagement with evidence-based mobile apps that promote behavior change; and develop interventions for pain self-management, sleep, and financial well-being. Sara received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Rhode Island and is currently an adjunct faculty member to the Psychology Department.